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AFTNC

AFTNC clinical members are MFTs, psychologists, social workers, and counselors with special interest in working with families and couples. Members may work with indivdual adults, children, adolescents, and groups as well as doing conjoint therapy

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For information on becoming a member, contact us at membership@aftnc.com
For information on getting involved with the AFTNC Council, contact us at president@aftnc.com
For assistance with this site, contact us at 510-838-2177 or help@aftnc.com

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Events - Future Events View

The event calendar shows upcoming club events. Select a view then use the navigation buttons to move between dates. Click on the event to view more information, including the event description, times, location, fees and any rules regarding attendance; you can also register for events from this screen. Click on the magnifying glass on the toolbar to see search and filter options.


Future Events

September, 2024

Sunday
22
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Careers in Family & Couples Therapy Panel with Kate Threlfall, Ph.D., Alex Klein, Psy.D., Keith Bones, Psy.D., and Aaron Gonzales, MA, LMFT

Join us for a panel of family therapists in various employment settings. In this workshop, a panel of family therapists will discuss their career paths in family and couples therapy. Hear how practicing clinicians launched their practice, got involved in teaching and publishing, worked in hospital settings, and other creative activities in the field of couples and family therapy.

Please contact Celestine Snell, M.A, AFTNC Student Rep at csnell@alliant.edu or Elaina Vielbaum, Psy.D, AFTNC Student Rep at evielbaum@wi.edu for any questions.
Saturday
28
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Come join Deb Dana, LCSW, for a weekend workshop!

The autonomic nervous system is at the heart of daily living, powerfully shaping experiences of safety and influencing the capacity for connection. How we move through the world—turning toward, backing away, sometimes attaching and other times isolating—is guided by this system. We now understand how in response to traumatic experiences, autonomic pathways of connection are replaced with patterns of protection and the drive to survive operates in opposition to the need for connection. With the development of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to the neurophysiological processes of mobilization, collapse, and social engagement and can reliably help clients reshape their autonomic responses and rewrite the stories that are carried in their autonomic pathways. With an updated map of the autonomic circuits that underlie behaviors and beliefs, we can lead our clients out of adaptive survival responses into the autonomically regulated state of safety that sets the stage for connection and is necessary for successful treatment.

A Polyvagal Theory guided approach to therapy begins with helping clients map their autonomic profiles and track their moment-to-moment movement along the autonomic hierarchy. With this foundation, the essential clinical questions address how to help clients interrupt habitual response patterns and find safety in a state of engagement. Working from a foundation of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to becoming a regulated and co-regulating resource, practical ways to effectively help clients identify and interrupt their familiar response patterns, and strategies to shape their autonomic nervous systems toward safety and connection.
Sunday
29
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Less Info
Come join Deb Dana, LCSW, for a weekend workshop!

The autonomic nervous system is at the heart of daily living, powerfully shaping experiences of safety and influencing the capacity for connection. How we move through the world—turning toward, backing away, sometimes attaching and other times isolating—is guided by this system. We now understand how in response to traumatic experiences, autonomic pathways of connection are replaced with patterns of protection and the drive to survive operates in opposition to the need for connection. With the development of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to the neurophysiological processes of mobilization, collapse, and social engagement and can reliably help clients reshape their autonomic responses and rewrite the stories that are carried in their autonomic pathways. With an updated map of the autonomic circuits that underlie behaviors and beliefs, we can lead our clients out of adaptive survival responses into the autonomically regulated state of safety that sets the stage for connection and is necessary for successful treatment.

A Polyvagal Theory guided approach to therapy begins with helping clients map their autonomic profiles and track their moment-to-moment movement along the autonomic hierarchy. With this foundation, the essential clinical questions address how to help clients interrupt habitual response patterns and find safety in a state of engagement. Working from a foundation of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to becoming a regulated and co-regulating resource, practical ways to effectively help clients identify and interrupt their familiar response patterns, and strategies to shape their autonomic nervous systems toward safety and connection.

October, 2024

Tuesday
8
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This will be a training in which you will be able to learn an evidence-based modality that can be used with families. Multidimensional Family Therapy can be used with diverse families and can create lasting change. Training will include case vignette discussions, as well as Q&A with an MDFT-trained therapist.