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AFTNC

AFTNC clinical members are MFTs, psychologists, social workers, and counselors with special interest in working with families and couples. Members may work with indivdual adults, children, adolescents, and groups as well as doing conjoint therapy

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For information on becoming a member, contact us at membership@aftnc.com
For information on getting involved with the AFTNC Council, contact us at president@aftnc.com
For assistance with this site, contact us at 510-838-2177 or help@aftnc.com

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Events - Future Events View

The event calendar shows upcoming club events. Select a view then use the navigation buttons to move between dates. Click on the event to view more information, including the event description, times, location, fees and any rules regarding attendance; you can also register for events from this screen. Click on the magnifying glass on the toolbar to see search and filter options.


Future Events

February, 2024

Saturday
24
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Therapy with couples on the brink of relationship dissolution involves special challenges. Couples present with high levels of disdain, low motivation, and hopelessness. One or both partners may be highly ambivalent about engaging in therapy and may be reluctant to try new and more positive interaction styles for fear that progress may trap them in the relationship. Social and personal justice issues around power often play a role in the couple’s distress. This presentation will provide a science-based integrative approach to working with last chance couples. A taxonomy of five types of last chance couples will be described: High conflict couples; those in which there has been a value or safety violation (interpersonal violence, infidelity, substance overuse); couples where partners have mismatched personal timelines/life goals; couples with little to no passionate connection; and couples in which a partner feels the need to pursue further psychosocial and sexual development outside the relationship. Research-supported techniques for establishing a therapeutic alliance and contract will be described. Clinical vignettes will illustrate effective techniques drawn from a multi-perspectival approach to couple therapy (the Therapeutic Palette Integrative Couple Therapy and the Creative Relational Movement Approach to Change) that integrates systemic, cognitive-behavioral, structural, intergenerational, attachment, experiential, psychodynamic, narrative, neuroscience, feminist, multicultural, and existential perspectives and practices.

March, 2024

Saturday
30
Family Recovery Institute (in-person) & via Zoom (online)
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Clients requiring intensive treatment for substance abuse, mood, eating and trauma-based
disorders typically grew up in family systems wounded by legacies of loss from which the
members have never fully recovered. This presentation will describe the nature of family system woundedness including the behavioral, relational, spiritual and epigenetic effects of life in such environments, approaches to engage members in a clinical conversation that will benefit all family members, and offer some strategies for harnessing the power of the intense counter-transference reactions clinicians will customarily encounter.

September, 2024

Saturday
28
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Come join Deb Dana, LCSW, for a weekend workshop!

The autonomic nervous system is at the heart of daily living, powerfully shaping experiences of safety and influencing the capacity for connection. How we move through the world—turning toward, backing away, sometimes attaching and other times isolating—is guided by this system. We now understand how in response to traumatic experiences, autonomic pathways of connection are replaced with patterns of protection and the drive to survive operates in opposition to the need for connection. With the development of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to the neurophysiological processes of mobilization, collapse, and social engagement and can reliably help clients reshape their autonomic responses and rewrite the stories that are carried in their autonomic pathways. With an updated map of the autonomic circuits that underlie behaviors and beliefs, we can lead our clients out of adaptive survival responses into the autonomically regulated state of safety that sets the stage for connection and is necessary for successful treatment.

A Polyvagal Theory guided approach to therapy begins with helping clients map their autonomic profiles and track their moment-to-moment movement along the autonomic hierarchy. With this foundation, the essential clinical questions address how to help clients interrupt habitual response patterns and find safety in a state of engagement. Working from a foundation of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to becoming a regulated and co-regulating resource, practical ways to effectively help clients identify and interrupt their familiar response patterns, and strategies to shape their autonomic nervous systems toward safety and connection.
Sunday
29
More Info
Less Info
Come join Deb Dana, LCSW, for a weekend workshop!

The autonomic nervous system is at the heart of daily living, powerfully shaping experiences of safety and influencing the capacity for connection. How we move through the world—turning toward, backing away, sometimes attaching and other times isolating—is guided by this system. We now understand how in response to traumatic experiences, autonomic pathways of connection are replaced with patterns of protection and the drive to survive operates in opposition to the need for connection. With the development of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to the neurophysiological processes of mobilization, collapse, and social engagement and can reliably help clients reshape their autonomic responses and rewrite the stories that are carried in their autonomic pathways. With an updated map of the autonomic circuits that underlie behaviors and beliefs, we can lead our clients out of adaptive survival responses into the autonomically regulated state of safety that sets the stage for connection and is necessary for successful treatment.

A Polyvagal Theory guided approach to therapy begins with helping clients map their autonomic profiles and track their moment-to-moment movement along the autonomic hierarchy. With this foundation, the essential clinical questions address how to help clients interrupt habitual response patterns and find safety in a state of engagement. Working from a foundation of Polyvagal Theory, therapists have a guide to becoming a regulated and co-regulating resource, practical ways to effectively help clients identify and interrupt their familiar response patterns, and strategies to shape their autonomic nervous systems toward safety and connection.